The Open Home

living with an open heart

I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing

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Libby continues to change. Now in her 5th month, she is currently sporting two rosy red cheeks as we enter the much anticipated teething phase. She is still intrigued by her hands and can happily while away the hours just sitting there clasping them or wiggling her chubby fingers in the air. She still likes to stop for a chat half way through a feed and continues to enjoy Mummy’s singing, much to Mummy’s surprise.

However, she no longer sneezes five, six, seven, eight times in a row, or snuffles like a piglet during her sleep. She no longer keeps one eye closed to save on energy and her skinny, gangly legs have become chubby little thighs that make parental cannibalism a real threat.

Each new milestone we celebrate, yet at each new milestone we say goodbye to a stage we have loved and lost all too soon.

It hit me the other day that if I hadn’t changed career to be a stay-at-home mother, now that Libby is over 18 weeks old I would need to be returning to work. Now, since becoming a mother I would definitely be classed as a sentimental type and the very thought of having to leave my daughter literally brought tears to my eyes.

My little girl has already changed so much and continues to change on a weekly basis. As a mother, I therefore make it a regular habit to stop to smell the roses, or rather stop to smell my daughter, quite literally sometimes! I close my eyes, block out the world around me and take some time to consciously breathe in that sweet baby smell; listen to that comforting, peaceful breath; or with wide eyes take in every detail of that chubby little foot!

The cliches are true, they grow so fast and I want to savour every moment. I don’t want to miss a thing.

I am so thankful that at this point in my life I can continue to be home with my wee girl. This is truly a blessing, not just for me, but for Libby and the Husby too.

I admit that I didn’t always plan on being a stay-at-home mother. Back in my late teens and maybe even early twenties, I would have thought that I would want to continue working, to feel fulfilled and useful in a professional capacity. So, I realise the role of the stay-at-home mother is not for everyone. I also realise that there are many mothers who would love to be home more with their little ones, but for whatever reason it is necessary for them to continue in the work place.

This is why I am all the more grateful to find myself at home with my daughter. I have actually never felt so fulfilled or so needed in my entire life and I just feel so blessed that now that I’ve realised that I want to be home full-time with my baby, I can.

I feel that as a mother I can finally be exactly who God made me to be. My strengths, skills and passions all fit perfectly with my role of mum and I have come to realise that being a mother does not mean giving up on a professional career. Like Jamie Martin, the Steady Mom, I too am now on ‘a journey towards intentional, professional motherhood’ and I’m loving it!

What are your experiences of motherhood?

4 thoughts on “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing

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  2. Pingback: Look who’s one! | The Open Home

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